Inspiration: Sharpening failure

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Losing the election by ten votes or by a million–which is worse?

“Missed it by that much,” is a way to amplify how we feel when we don’t succeed. So, when we miss the bus by just a few seconds, or finish a math proof just behind the competition–we can beat ourselves up about this for years.

Much rarer, it seems, is the opposite. It’s hard to find people still congratulating themselves after winning an election by just a few votes or making a plane by a step or two. Nice that it happened, but we ask what’s next, where’s the next crisis?

We have a name for someone who expects the worst in the future. Pessimism is a choice. But we don’t seem to have a name for someone who describes the past with the same negative cast. Continue reading “Inspiration: Sharpening failure”

A prosecutor’s vision for a better justice system | Adam Foss

“When a kid commits a crime, the US justice system has a choice: prosecute to the full extent of the law, or take a step back and ask if saddling young people with criminal records is the right thing to do every time.”

This is an amazing and thought provoking video! Adam Foss, a prosecutor with the Suffolk County District Attorney’s Office in Boston, makes his case for a reformed justice system that replaces wrath with opportunity, changing people’s lives for the better instead of ruining them.

As I was watching this video, I had to of course think about the Nigerian criminal justice system, which we all know is in dire need of reform. Continue reading “A prosecutor’s vision for a better justice system | Adam Foss”

Daily Inspiration: The thrill is gone

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Of course it is.

The definition of a thrill is temporary excitement, usually experienced for the first time.

It’s thrilling to ride a roller coaster. The fifth time you have to ride it, though, it’s more than a chore, it’s torture.

The definition of the thrill is that it’s going to be gone soon.

You might have been thrilled to go to your first job the first day. Or thrilled to see the first comment on your blog or thrilled the first time one of your books was translated into another language.

But after that? How can repeating it be thrilling? Continue reading “Daily Inspiration: The thrill is gone”

A Model of Achievement – Deng Thiak Adut; From Child Soldier to Lawyer

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Photo Credit: ABC Sydney

This is an epic story if there ever once one!

I stumbled on this ad for Western Sydney University’s most extraordinary graduates, Deng Thiak Adut. According to Upworthy:

In his case, as you’ll learn, even the word “extraordinary” reeks of inadequacy because … well, this guy’s just indescribably persevering.

So what makes Deng so out of the ordinary?

Well, Three decades ago, he was just an ordinary kid growing up in Sudan. Then, the war came and Adut, then only 6 years old, was among tens of thousands of children conscripted to fight in the Second Sudanese Civil War. The troop of boys marched for 33 days into Ethiopia, living off the land along the way, before going into battle against the Sudan People’s Liberation Army.

“Kids. Going to war. You know they’re not going to come back because they’re going to put in everything they have. We were slaughtered,” – Adut

Continue reading “A Model of Achievement – Deng Thiak Adut; From Child Soldier to Lawyer”

Daily Inspiration:Ten questions for work that matters

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What are you doing that’s difficult?

What are you doing that people believe only you can do?

Who are you connecting?

What do people say when they talk about you?

What are you afraid of?

What’s the scarce resource?

Who are you trying to change?

What does the change look like?

Would we miss your work if you stopped making it? Continue reading “Daily Inspiration:Ten questions for work that matters”

Rodrigo Bijou: Governments don’t understand cyber warfare. We need hackers

The Internet has transformed the front lines of war, and it’s leaving governments behind. As security analyst Rodrigo Bijou shows, modern conflict is being waged online between non-state groups, activists and private corporations, and the digital landscape is proving to be fertile ground for the recruitment and radicalization of terrorists. Meanwhile, draconian surveillance programs are ripe for exploitation. Bijou urges governments to end mass surveillance programs and shut “backdoors” — and he makes a bold call for individuals to step up.